Cancer Genomics (CGX)

Statistics
Cancer Genomics (CGX)
What's Involved
1.
send in your sample

Request your physician-ordered CGX test online, provide a saliva sample at home, and mail it back.

2.
get your results

Your results will include your risk for common hereditary cancers along with personalized screening guidelines.

3.
talk to counselor

A board-certified genetic counselor will help answer your questions and discuss next steps.

4.
create a health plan

You and your healthcare provider can use your results to inform your screening and management plan.

Causes
Understanding your genetic risks
70-80%
Sporadic*
10-15%
Mutations passed down through families
15-20%
History but no known genetic link
Women
With and without genetic mutations
10%
Chance of getting Breast Cancer by the time they are 80
81%
Chance, a woman with a mutation in the BRCA1 gene
69%
Melanoma - CDKN2A
81%
Breast - BRCA1
54%
Uterine - MLH1
59%
Pancreatic - CDKN2A
83%
Stomach - CDH1
99%
Colorectal - APC
Men
With and without genetic mutations
2%
Chance of getting Colorectal Cancer by the time they are 70
70-99%
Chance, a man with a mutation in the APC gene
69%
Melanoma - CDKN2A
18%
Prostate - BRCA2
12%
Uterine - MLH1
59%
Pancreatic - CDKN2A
70%
Stomach - CDH1
99%
Colorectal - APC
Survival Rate
5 years after breast cancer is discovered in Women
98%
When detected early
25%
When detected at an advanced stage
50%
Chance of passing a mutation to children
Survival Rate
5 years after colorectal cancer is discovered in Men
90%
When detected early
13%
When detected at an advanced stage
50%
Chance of passing a mutation to children
* Even if your results show no mutations, you may still get cancer. While inherited mutations explain some cases of cancer, the majority are sporadic and can’t be explained by a single cause. Some non-genetic factors that can influence cancer risk include environment and lifestyle, as well as family history without a known genetic link.

REFERENCES

Tung N, Battelli C, Allen B, et al. Frequency of mutations in individuals with breast cancer referred for BRCA1 and BRCA2 testing using next-generation sequencing with a 25-gene panel. Cancer. January 2015;121(1):25-33. Pubmed Abstract

Pal T, Permuth-Wey J, Betts JA, et al. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations account for a large proportion of ovarian carcinoma cases. Cancer. December 2005;104(12):2807-16. Pubmed Abstract

Risch HA, McLaughlin JR, Cole DE, et al. Prevalence and penetrance of germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in a population series of 649 women with ovarian cancer. Am J Hum Genet. March 2001;68(3):700-10. Pubmed Abstract

Claus EB, Risch N, Thompson WD, et al. The calculation of breast cancer risk for women with a first degree family history of ovarian cancer. Breast Cancer Res Treat. November 1993;28(2):115-20. Pubmed Abstract

Antoniou A, Pharoah PD, Narod S, et al. Average risks of breast and ovarian cancer associated with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations detected in case Series unselected for family history: a combined analysis of 22 studies. Hum Genet. May 2003;72(5):1117-30. Pubmed Abstract

Moyer VA on behalf of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Risk assessment, genetic counseling, and genetic testing for BRCA-related cancer in women: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement. Ann Intern Med. 2014 Feb 18;160(4):271-81.

Bonadona V, Bonaiti B, Olschwang S, et al. Cancer risks associated with germline mutations in MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 genes in Lynch syndrome. JAMA. June 2011;305(22):2304-10.

Dowty JG, Win AK, Buchanan DD, et al. Cancer risks for MLH1 and MSH2 mutation carriers. Hum Mutat. March 2013;34(3):490-7.

Richards S, Aziz N, Bale S, et al. Standards and guidelines for the interpretation of sequence variants: a joint consensus recommendation of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Genet Med. 2015;17(5):405-24.

CONTACT

135 E. 57th St., 14th Floor
New York, NY 10022

(877) RM GENETICS
(877) 764-3638

info@rmgenetics.com

ABOUT RM GENETICS

At RM Genetics, we strive to work with health providers and facilities to help them offer personalized medical care to their patients and residents. We provide complete program management and support that allows healthcare providers the ability to offer optimal patient care with no inconveniences or added operational requirements. Our Pharmacogenomic testing programs are customized to the patient and resident treatment types and are covered by Medicare and other Health Insurance providers.